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Stay abreast of the latest sales, discounts, news, product releases, projects, and guides here on our blog. 

New Carved Ring Patterns

Silent Thunder Ordnance

Our four carving patterns, from left to right: Paisley, Islamic Star, Islamic Knot, and Weave. Finishes are, from left to right: Copper, Bronze, and Silver.

Our four carving patterns, from left to right: Paisley, Islamic Star, Islamic Knot, and Weave. Finishes are, from left to right: Copper, Bronze, and Silver.

If you didn’t know, we offer a variety of metallic finishes and carved patterns to embellish our standard polymer rings. And we just added two new patterns, check them out!

Lets have a chat about ring design

Silent Thunder Ordnance

Lets have a chat about ring design. Here at CTR, we have what is very likely the broadest catalogue of Asiatic ring designs in the world. That brings with it unique insights regarding ring design and function, but also presents a real challenge to our customers: which ring do you actually want and why?

If you’re relatively new to Asiatic archery, or are moving over to a historically authentic from one of the popular modern “Southeast Asian” style rings, the short answer is we strongly recommend you start with our popular Chinese Spur style ring. One of our leather ring inserts makes for a nice comfort and grip enhancing addition. So if that recommendation is all you came here for, go for it, this is the TL;DR answer.

For those interested in the dynamics at play though, lets start by looking at the the popular “Southeast Asian” style of our competitors. (yes, by popular demand and for the sake of a complete collection we do offer our interpretation of the style as well) What makes this design popular? Well the short answer is that it is very comfortable with low-poundage bows, and it is very easy to use particularly as it is designed for and encourages a “death grip” on the thumb. This over-curling of the thumb is very natural if you're a beginner, as there is a lot to concentrate on and there is a very real fear that the string will slip off the ring. So this style adapts to that, encouraging and even in some cases requiring one to fully curl their thumb and pinch the ring and string and arrow as much as possible. The release this produces is generally not as fast and clean as a more advanced ring style, however the real problem comes about when heavier bows are drawn.

You see this style does another thing, and that is load greater than 50% of the force of drawing the bow on the thumb pad. It does this by positioning the string fairly far away from the knuckle joint. On low poundage bows and for newcomers this is very comfortable, because we are all used to loading force on the pads of our thumbs, we do it every day. At higher poundages though, this rapidly exceeds the thumb and index finger's strength to retain the arrow, and begins to over-burden the pad of the thumb itself causing pain.

More advanced ring designs shift much of this load off the pad of the thumb, and onto the sides of the knuckle which can, with practice, bear vastly more force and allows the comfortable drawing of much much heavier bows. 60-80% of the draw force should be borne by the sides of the knuckle, Adam Karpowicz has noted this as well. And designs of antiquity virtually all follow this rule. Don't believe me? Note Turkish designs. Look at how little meat is there to cover the thumb's pad, it couldn't possibly be bearing the majority of the force, really it is there simply to kick the thumb out of the way upon release.

Okay, so we've established where force should be loaded on the thumb, but how does this affect the archer's dynamics? Well there are a couple things. First, the #1 form fault I see is over-curling of the thumb, the string should not be “cornered” in the thumb, it should be gently balanced on the ring, neither driving into the soft flesh of the thumb nor slipping off and releasing the string. It is worth noting that rotation of the wrist and pressing of the index finger into the string and arrow gently is part of this balance. This sense of balance is the primary skill to be learned when it comes to shooting rings. Put simply, you should be grabbing the tip of your thumb with your index finger a LOT less than you may think. If you really want to feel how a fast snappy ring should behave, one that is unforgiving of form faults but is a great teacher, I can't recommend our Turkish style ring highly enough. It will not only enforce the opening of the thumb and a gentle balanced hold of the string, it will also quickly teach you the ills of another form fault: excess retained tension in the thumb.

This brings me nicely around to our Gao Ying style ring. It has a string guard, but if you read The Way of Archery, you'll note Gao's guard was added with the intent of protecting the string from the thin side walls. THIS IS NOT A BEGINNER'S STYLE OF RING. The release angle is in fact quite aggressive and the shelf upon which it sits quite narrow. Whereas most great ring designs allow the string to provide feedback, this design protects the thumb and makes the over-curling side of balance difficult to feel. While a beginner certainly can learn on this style of ring, the consequence for bad form is longer term discomfort, namely the area around the tendon relief begin to cause discomfort as the ring is inappropriately driven rearward into the thumb, rather than an instant and obvious need of correction. In essence, the ring is adequately comfortable when used incorrectly to make the archer think the flaw lies with the design rather than their form if that makes sense.

This permits me to circle nicely back around to the Chinese Spur style ring. It uses the arrow to help position the string on the ring, providing a consistent index point. If the archer curls the thumb too hard, driving the string backward toward the thumb, this will provide immediate feedback causing the ring to twist on the thumb. This painless feedback is perfect for teaching balance without the discomfort of learning on something like our very popular Ottoman style ring. Our Ottoman style appears visually similar to our Chinese Spur style ring, however there are numerous subtle tweaks, aside from the obvious spur, to accommodate the slightly different ways in which these two rings load force on the thumb.

There is no reason why the Chinese Spur style ring is necessarily for beginners, far from it actually. It is the style we recommend users learn on, but they can also happily use it forever to no disadvantage.

What of our other designs? Well the Byzantine is our earliest design still in our catalogue. It is beautiful, but a bit of an anachronism. While perfectly fine on lower poundage bows, it offers minimal support for the sides of the thumb and a fairly steep release angle. Historical examples are even thinner than ours. My longstanding hypothesis on this ring, which is widely held by others here at CTR, is that the design was meant for use in warfare to be worn OVER gloves, and its slim design was meant to minimize interference when transitioning from the bow to polearms or the like. If you were looking for a piece of functional jewelry, this ring would be my first choice.

The Sarmatian is another odd duck, not as slim as the Byzantine, but still unusually thin. In some regards, I think of it as a transitional ring. To my knowledge it is the oldest metal archer's ring ever found, and one of the oldest archer's rings ever found flat out. (technically Nubian rings predate it, however are made of stone) It is very likely, being an early ring design, that it is not as technologically advanced as some later designs. Whether it was meant to be paired with a glove or the like we'll never know, however I suspect the rear loop was meant to be used with a leather thong tied around the wrist thus moving some of the force off the thumb entirely.

The Tongue rings are odd, but appear to act much like a very gentle thumb protector, barely discouraging the string from shifting rearward. The long tongue ring in particular does encourage clarance between the thumb tip and the string, so if you have issues with retained tension in the thumb, this ring might be treatment rather than cure.

Our Mughal style ring is as much an exercise in style as it is one in ring design. Being fully contoured it requires an expert sense of balance to use. It is both robust and elegant, and offers something of a “choose-your-own-aventure” in terms of string positioning and the thumb pad/knuckle force spit. If you can comfortably use this ring on a powerful bow, you've very likely mastered the use of rings.

And, finally, there is our Sugakji or Korean Male style thumb ring. This ring loads ALL the force onto the thumb's knuckle, and does so with the aid of a wedge of some form. Sometimes these are made of rubber, but traditionally they were made of leather. Thus the ring is able to effectively “shrink” once slipped over the knuckle, providing a very secure and comfortable fit.

And this segues nicely into the use of leather with rings, the final thing I want to touch on here. I can't recommend the addition of leather to your ring highly enough. While made for the Sugakji, most of our ring styles can have their fit snugged up with either the korean leather inserts or a kulak. But their utility goes beyond that. The kulak can act as a mild string protector on many of our ring designs, further increasing comfort. They also remain grippy when wet, which is incredibly helpful as you start to perspire when shooting. While some traditional styles of ring are found with leather, others are not but this doesn't mean they didn't use them. In TWOA for example, leather not pictured was referenced in use with traditional designs. It seems likely that many if not most rings involved some use of leather for comfort and function, and we shouldn't shy away from it simply because we have not found them depicted that way yet. Archers of antiquity faced the same challenges we do today.

I hope that serves as a brief overview of ring design, and some of the functions behind it. One could write volumes on the subject, but I hope for now this brief overview will suffice.

Collector's Pack

Silent Thunder Ordnance

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Here at CTR we have one of if not the largest collections of historical ring designs available for sale. In recognition of that, we’re pleased to offer an Ultimate Collector’s Pack which puts all these ring styles together in one place. Included in that are 13 different rings:


TRMT - Manchu Thick
TR5 - Byzantine
TR6 - Ottoman
TR7 - Hybrid
TR9L - Tongue Long
TR10 - Chinese Spur
TR11 - Turkish
TR12 - Sarmatian
TR13 - Korean Male
TR14 - Southeast Asian
TR15 - Mughal
TR16 - Chinese Tongue-Spur
TR17 - Ming Chinese (Gao Ying)

Gao Ying's Ring

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Our interpretation of a Gao Ying Four Victory Ring

Our interpretation of a Gao Ying Four Victory Ring

With the huge popularity of Justin Ma and Jie Tian’s translation for Gao Ying’s military manual, there has come a demand for a ring designed based on the book’s descriptions and drawings. We just had to take up the challenge!

The result we think has good fidelity to the original, and offers a great shooting experience. I would describe this as an intermediate level ring. On the one hand, the “two prong guard” can encourage over-gripping and excessive retained tension in the thumb, both basic form faults. On the other hand the large load bearing surfaces on the sides and the relief for the thumb’s tendon provide excellent comfort. Despite the aggressive release angle though, the ring is exceptionally docile and easy to manage. It is definitely one of our all-time favorites!

Our interpretation of “Gao’s Four Victory Ring,” shown here next to some of the source material from which we derived it. A big thanks to Jie Tian and Justin Ma for writing this book. (ref. Tian, J. & Ma, J. (2015) 978-0764347917)

Our interpretation of “Gao’s Four Victory Ring,” shown here next to some of the source material from which we derived it. A big thanks to Jie Tian and Justin Ma for writing this book. (ref. Tian, J. & Ma, J. (2015) 978-0764347917)

Product Spotlight - Ring Decoration

Silent Thunder Ordnance

One of our Chinese Spur rings in Nocturnal Blue given a copper coating and weave pattern carving

One of our Chinese Spur rings in Nocturnal Blue given a copper coating and weave pattern carving

Love our ring designs, but want something with a little more spice? Well our custom ring decoration is exactly that! We currently offer two standard metallic coatings, bronze and copper, which look a lot like media blasted metal. It makes for beautiful rings, and you can leave it at that, but we also offer carving. This carving is available only on our coated polymer rings, and as you can see above is very dramatic. We offer two standard styles, weave and paisley.

For teams, vendors, groups, etc we can also offer a high level of customization in an exclusive production run of rings. This includes custom carvings, as well as custom colors. Want electric blue rings with a team logo on the inside of the thumb pad or on the band? We can do that. Message us to inquire!

Just a few of the different coatings we can offer in custom production runs. Seen at center is a real favorite of ours which changes color depending on what angle it is viewed.

Just a few of the different coatings we can offer in custom production runs. Seen at center is a real favorite of ours which changes color depending on what angle it is viewed.

Out of Office 11/22/18 - 11/25/18

Silent Thunder Ordnance

We will be out of the office for the Thanksgiving holiday, 11/22/18 - 11/25/18, so will be unable to ship orders or respond to inquiries. During this time we’ll have the coupon code TURKEY2018 active, so customers who enter it at checkout can get a 5% discount on all orders. Happy holidays everyone!

Custom Ring Design

Silent Thunder Ordnance

A recombination of our tongue and chinese spur rings in solid copper.

A recombination of our tongue and chinese spur rings in solid copper.

We do, on occasion, get requests for fully bespoke ring designs.The challenge of such things is the initial design and development work, once that is complete we can manufacture a virtually unlimited number of that ring in any size or applicable material. This ring was borne of just such a request: the combination of our short tongue with our spur ring, to be manufactured in solid mirror polish copper. And, if I do say so myself, I think it came out absolutely beautifully. Fresh off the polisher, it has that perfectly light pink look of raw copper, not yet darkened by oxidation.

A recombination of our tongue and chinese spur rings in solid copper.

A recombination of our tongue and chinese spur rings in solid copper.

World's Largest Thumb Ring

Silent Thunder Ordnance

The world’s largest thumb ring, shown here in our Mughal style. For size comparison is one of our Ottoman rings with our copper coating.

The world’s largest thumb ring, shown here in our Mughal style. For size comparison is one of our Ottoman rings with our copper coating.

Not satisfied with simply having the broadest selection of historical thumb ring designs available, we also wanted the biggest. And here it is, the largest archer’s thumb ring ever made. (to our knowledge) At over 30 centimeters long, this ring is about ten times the size of a ring you’d typically order/wear. If you wanted to draw a very large bow with your leg, instead of your thumb, it’d be about the right size to go around your thigh.

What was the point of this? Absolutely none. But it was fun, funny, and get out there and shoot!